Setting default device credentials optional

pcbinary June 27, 2021 0 Comments



Set Up Your MIDI Devices


All MIDI-capable hardware devices are collectively referred to as ExternalDevices in Studio One. There are three types of External Devices: Keyboards,Instruments, and Control Surfaces. While each device type functions in aslightly different way, there is one menu to add and configure any ExternalDevice. The menu can be found by navigating to Studio One/Options/ExternalDevices/Add Device (macOS: Preferences/External Devices/Add Device).

Set Up MIDI Keyboards


A MIDI keyboard controller is a hardware MIDI device that is generally usedfor playing and controlling other MIDI devices, virtual software instruments,and software parameters. In Studio One, these devices are referred to asKeyboards. Before recording a performance with a Keyboard, the MIDI keyboardcontroller must first be set up in Studio One. Once a Keyboard is set up, itis available at all times for use in Studio One.To set up your Keyboard, navigate to Studio One/Options/External Devices(macOS: Preferences/External Devices) and follow these steps: 1. In the Options/External Devices menu (macOS: Preferences/External Devices), click on the [Add…] button. 2. Choose your device from the predefined device list or set this to New Keyboard if you do not see your device in the list. * If set to New Keyboard, you may wish to type in a Manufacturer Name and a Device Name in the appropriate fields. This makes identifying your Keyboard easier. 3. Specify which MIDI channels to use to communicate with this Keyboard. All MIDI channels are selected by default. * If you are unsure of the appropriate MIDI channels to use, just leave this at the default setting. 4. Engage Split Channels if you would like to create a separate Instrument Track input for each MIDI channel from the Keyboard. 5. Specify the device to which the Keyboard is sending and the device from which it is receiving via Studio One. Select your device driver name from the drop-down menu for both Receive From and Send To. 6. You can choose to use this Keyboard as your Default Virtual Instrument Input by checking the appropriate box. If you are using only one Keyboard with Studio One, you should check this box. 7. Enable MPE if your Keyboard is able to transmit MPE data (MIDI Polyphonic Expression). Use the Pitch Range field to specify the range of the keyboard (the number of keys in chromatic steps). Note that when the Enable MPE box is checked, the MIDI Channels and Split Channels fields are disabled. Also, Enable MPE must be active for a virtual instrument if you want to takeadvantage of this feature. This is done in the Instrument Editor window.Your Keyboard is now ready for use in Studio One. * Click on the button in the External window of the Console to quickly set up a new Keyboard or other External Device.

Set Up External Hardware Instruments


In Studio One, an External Instrument is an external MIDI hardwaresynthesizer, workstation, or other device that can generate or manipulatesound. External instruments are set up globally and then are available for usein any Song. The audio output of an external instrument can be routed throughone or more Aux Channels in the Studio One Console, where its volume can becontrolled with sample-accurate automation, its live signal can be processedby the effects plug-ins, and its performance can be included in a Trackbounce, an exported Stem, or the mixdown of a Song.To set up your Instrument, navigate to Studio One/Options/External Devices(macOS: Preferences/External Devices) and follow these steps: 1. In the Options/External Devices menu, click on the [Add…] button. 2. In the left-hand browser, choose your device from the predefined device list. Set this to New Instrument if you do not see your device in the list. If set to New Instrument, you may wish to type in a Manufacturer Name and a Device Name in the appropriate fields. This makes identifying your New Instrument easier. 3. Specify which MIDI channels to use to communicate with this Instrument. MIDI Channel 1 is selected by default. If you are unsure of the appropriate MIDI channels to use, just leave this at the default setting. 4. Specify the device to which Studio One is sending MIDI and the device from which the software is receiving MIDI. Select the appropriate MIDI device from the drop-down menu for Send To and (optionally) Receive From. It is likely your external instrument is not connected directly to your computer. In this case, your external instrument must be physically connected to another MIDI device (such as a MIDI interface) that does connect to your computer; you need to select the driver for that device. 5. You can choose to send MIDI Clock to this Instrument and/or use MIDI Clock Start by checking the appropriate boxes. You should send MIDI Clock to your Instrument if it has a built-in sequencer or components (such as LFOs) that need to sync to Studio One. Enabling MIDI Clock Start sends MIDI Clock Start signals to your Instrument. 6. You can choose to send MIDI Time Code to this Instrument. You can set a Display Offset under Song/Song Setup/General to correct for time-code variances with external devices. 7. You can vary the speed at which Automated MIDI CC messages are transmitted, using the CC Automation Interval slider. You can vary the value between 10-100 ms, with the default value being 10 ms. 8. Enable MPE if your Instrument has is able to receive MPE data (MIDI Polyphonic Expression). Use the Pitch Range field to specify the range of the instrument (the number of chromatic steps it can reach). Note that when the Enable MPE box is checked, the MIDI Channels field is disabled.Your external instrument is now available for use in any Song. The easiest wayto use an external instrument in a Song is to set up an Aux Channel. This isdescribed in the next section.Note that if your instrument is also a controller (such as a keyboardworkstation), you need to set it up twice. First, set it up as an ExternalInstrument without a Receive From selection, and then set it up as a Keyboard,without a Send To selection. This allows the keyboard-controller section ofthe workstation to be used as a source for Instrument Tracks, while allowingthe synthesizer section to be used as an external instrument.

Set Up Control Surfaces


In Studio One, a Control Surface is a hardware device that includes transportcontrols, faders, and other specialized controls. The control surface mightuse MIDI directly or via a special control layer such as Mackie Control.To set up a Control Surface, do the following: 1. In the Options/External Devices menu (macOS: Preferences/External Devices, click on the [Add…] button. 2. Choose your device from the predefined device list. Set this to New Control Surface if you do not see your device in the list. If set to New Control Surface, you may wish to type in a Manufacturer Name and a Device Name in the appropriate fields. This makes identifying the Control Surface easier. 3. Specify the device to which the Control Surface is sending and the device from which it is receiving via Studio One. Select your MIDI device driver name from the drop-down menu for both Receive From and Send To. 4. You do not need to specify the MIDI channels your Control Surface should use, as control surfaces use alternative protocols, such as Mackie Control, to communicate with Studio One. 5. Your Control Surface is now ready for use in Studio One. For more information on using Mackie Control devices with Studio One, seeMackie Control.

Use Your Computer Keyboard as a MIDI Keyboard


You can use your regular QWERTY computer keyboard as a MIDI Keyboard to playvirtual instruments and record note data in Studio One. To do this, add a newdevice in the Studio One/Options/External Devices/Add Device menu (macOS:Preferences/External Devices/Add Device), choosing the QWERTY Keyboard devicefrom the PreSonus device folder.With the device added, to use your keyboard as a MIDI Keyboard, open theinterface for the QWERTY Keyboard device by double-clicking on it in theExternal panel of the Console. Any record-enabled Instrument Track thenreceives input from the QWERTY Keyboard, as shown in the QWERTY Keyboarddevice interface. Your keyboard only transmits data to Instrument Tracks whilethe QWERTY Keyboard device interface is open.

Setting default device credentials (optional)


For most of you, this isn’t relevant in a home network environment. Only ifyou have a lot of network device or running a Windows Domain you could savesome time by setting the credentials on a top-level group.If you want to set the default credentials, then go back to the Devices tab.Here you will see a list of all the discovered devices. PRTG willautomatically start with an auto discover to scan your local network fordevices. We will get to that later on.For now, we select the Local Probe and click on Settings. We are going to setsome default credentials for our network. This is only useful if you havemultiple devices on SNMP v3 with the same credentials or running a WindowsDomain at home.If you scroll down the Probe Settings page you will see Credential options fordifferent protocols. They are all set on “Inherit from root”, turn it off tochange the credentials.You can do this for all the relevant protocols and for you Windows Systems ifthey are all part of a domain.

Adding all devices


We are now ready to start monitoring our network devices. To easiest way is tocreate a new Auto-discovery Group named “Temp”. You will need to know yourlocal IP range to create this group. If you don’t know it, you can find it bygoing to * Start * Type CMD and press enter * Type the following command: ipconfigThe result will look similar to this:So the Ip Range is 192.168.1 and the IP address of the router is 192.168.1.1(we need that later). Now create the temporary Auto-discovery Group. Set theGroup Name to Temp, and scroll down to IPv4 Base. Here you enter the IP Rangeof your local network, in my case: 192.168.1. Leave everything else on defaultand click OKThis will take a couple of minutes, a good time to get a coffee before wecontinue.After a minute of 5 PRTG has scanned every device that it could find in yournetwork. Now it’s time to move the devices to their groups. You will recognizesome of the devices by its name, but other might show only an IP Address.Start with the devices you know, then we can work on the devices that areleft.To move a device in PRTG to another group, just right click on the device andselect Move > To Other Group. While you are moving the device to their groups,it is a good idea to rename the devices so you can recognize them a little biteasier later on. Just click on the device name and go to the settings tab.Change the device name (and icon if you want to)

Resolving unknow devices


After we moved the known devices to their corresponding groups (like computersor homey (a Smart Hub) ) we are left with some IP Address. Earlier we lookedup our IP Range, in the output we also noted the Gateway address, this is ourrouter. In my case it was 192.168.1.1, so we can move the device with thataddress to the Network Infrastructure group.To help find the other devices, you can use a free program called Advanced IPScanner. Install the program and click in the Green Play button Scan to startthe network scan. This will return a list with all active network devices.The advantage is of this tool is that it will also show the manufacturer. Thisway we now know that the device with 192.168.1.10 is my Smart Thermostat Tadoand the device 192.168.1.211 is the access point. But after this tool we arestill left with some unknown devices, these can be your smartphones (login toyour router might show the connected wifi clients) or smart tv’s (check thenetwork settings on your tv to find its IP Address)What you also can try is to navigate in your browser to the IP address, somenetwork devices can be managed over the web (like your router or switch). Workyour way through the list sorting out every device in your network. Alsoremember to turn on all network related devices when you run the scan (gameconsoles, tv’s, notebooks/tablets).

Scanning the devices


Because we used the auto-discovery group, PRTG has already found some of theavailable sensors. But if you want the details from a computer, like formonitoring the used bandwidth, we need to enter the credentials of the device.Select the device and go to the settings tab. Scroll down to Credentials forWindows systems (or Mac) and fill in the details. Just enter the computer nameand the login from an admin account. This will allow PRTG to scan the device.When you are done, click on Save. Right click on the Device name in the topleft corner and select Auto-Discovery > Run Auto-Discovery. PRTG will scan thedevice again with the new credentials.After it’s done you will a lot more sensors of the computer. In the list youwill find the network card, you can recognize it by its name (Intel ….Wireless.. ) and on the right side, it says Total *** Kbit/ s. You might haveanother network card, but you can still find yours by looking at the Graphcolumn and search for the sensor with Kbit/s.

Creating a Network Map with PRTG


We now have all the sensors for our home network, so we can start withcreating a network map. The network map will help you identify problems andmonitor your network traffic within your network.Click on Maps in the top navigation bar and Add Map (blue label on the rightside). Set the map width on 1700 and height on 750. This allows you to viewthe full map on a Full HD screen without scrolling.On the left side you will the devices we added to PRTG in the structure wecreated. On the right side, you find all sort of icons. Adding a device to themap is pretty simple, select the sensor, device or group on the left side. Itwill highlight blue, then find an icon, graph or table on the right side anddrag it on the map. You can always change an icon by dragging a new icon overit.I used Default Icons A on the map above for all the devices. The internetcloud can be found in Default Icons B (these are icons without sensors). Thegraphs are 2 days (small fonts) graphs. You can connect the device by draggingthe blue line to another icon.

How to Check Bandwidth Usage per Computer


If you have PRTG running you can use it to check the bandwidth usage percomputer. Because we are monitoring every device, we have a good overview ofwho is using the most bandwidth on our network. There are some limitationswith PRTG, you can read how much bandwidth your access point is using, buteach individual wifi device (mobile) is a bit harder. You could install PRTGMobile Probe on each mobile device, but an easier solution is to use a UnifiAccess point.So let’s say you want to know how much bandwidth a computer has used the lastweekend. We need to get the historical data from the computer to examine howmuch bandwidth is used. You can do this as follows: * Select the device in the device list * Select the network sensor * Click on the Historic Data tab * Set the date range (or use a Quick Range) * Click on StartA new page will open with the results. Below the chart you will see a table,we are looking for the Sums of the Traffic Out and Traffic In (and maybe theTraffic Total)I did a clean install of PRTG to write this guide, so I haven’t used a lot ofdata yet. But you can see here the amount of data I used. By default theresults will be in Kbit/s, you can change this by going to the settings of thenetwork card sensor. Scroll all the way down and change the Channel UnitConfiguration to MByte and Mbit. This will make it easier to read.

Monitoring Network Traffic


An important part of monitoring is set up alerts. You don’t want to look everyhour on your network map to see if everything is working. PRTG will send youan alert when a device is down, but you also need to set some limits. Like,alert me when Computer X has used 50Gb of data.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *